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Star Wars will not digitally recreate Carrie Fisher for future movies

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Written by Kamil Arli

THE STUDIO behind Star Wars has said it has no plans to digitally recreate film performances of the late actress Carrie Fisher in future films.

DISNEY HAS SHOT DOWN RUMORS THAT CARRIE FISHER WILL BE DIGITALLY RECREATED …

Disney has shot down rumors that Carrie Fisher will be digitally recreated for upcoming Star Wars films.

Lucasfilm confirmed there were ‘no plans’ for the late actress, who died unexpectedly last month, to return to the silver screen as Princess Leia, it said in a statement on Friday.

It was previously thought that Disney planned to use high-tech digital recreation to bring her beloved character back to the films.

The studio said Fisher, 60, would be missed and promised to ‘cherish her memory and legacy’ and to ‘always strive to honor everything she gave to Star Wars’.

Disney will not digitally recreate Carrie Fisher as Princess Leia in upcoming Star Wars films. Previous rumors said that special technology would be used. Carrie Fisher as Princess Leia in 1977's A New Hope is pictured left, and a reconstruction of her character using archive footage in December's Rogue One is shown right

Disney will not digitally recreate Carrie Fisher as Princess Leia in upcoming Star Wars films. Previous rumors said that special technology would be used. Carrie Fisher as Princess Leia in 1977’s A New Hope is pictured left, and a reconstruction of her character using archive footage in December’s Rogue One is shown right

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Before the official announcement, fans were speculating how Disney would bring Princess Leia back to the screen.

RUMORS CIRCULATED THAT IT WOULD BE THE SAME HIGH TECH DIGITAL RECREATION

Rumors circulated that it would be the same high-tech digital recreation used in digital wizardry that allowed Disney to bring back Peter Cushing’s Moff Tarkin character from the original 1977 film in the recent blockbuster Rogue One, despite the fact that Cushing died in 1994.

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That approach, so cutting-edge that the filmmakers had an alternate script prepped in case the effects failed, could have been similar to Disney’s plans for resurrecting Princess Leia.

Rogue One (spoiler alert!) also briefly features another digital resurrection: that of the young Princess Leia, played by Norwegian actress Ingvild Deila, with digital footage of Fisher from A New Hope superimposed on her face.

Disney used cutting-edge digital techniques to bring back Moff Tarkin, the character originally played in 1977 by Peter Cushing (pictured left). Cushing died in 1994

Disney used cutting-edge digital techniques to bring back Moff Tarkin, the character originally played in 1977 by Peter Cushing (pictured left). Cushing died in 1994

Although Fisher had reportedly already finished shooting scenes for Star Wars: Episode VIII, slated for release in December, her character was expected to play a major role in the following installment as well.

FISHER WAS 19 WHEN SHE FILMED A NEW HOPE IN 1977

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Fisher was 19 when she filmed A New Hope in 1977.

In the 2015 The Force Awakens, set 30 years after the original trilogy, Fisher returned as General Leia Organa.

In another case of digital resurrection, the filmmakers behind Fast & Furious 7 managed to create a stand-in for actor Paul Walker, who died with several key scenes left to shoot.

Walker’s two brothers stood in for the remaining scenes, and were digitally enhanced to resemble Walker by Peter Jackson’s special effects studio, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Recent advances in digital resurrection techniques have opened a can of ethical worms, with some actors moving to control or restrict rights to their images after death.

Actor Robin Williams, who died in 2014, prohibited any commercial use of his image until 2039

About the author

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Kamil Arli

Editor of DigitalReview.co. Digital Media Consultant

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